Who is the top dog? RZR XP Pro Ultimate vs. X3 X DS Turbo RR

Posted by Joe Hunt on

From the time the rumors began about a new RZR from Polaris, people have been wondering how, or if, it would compare to the Can-am X3. Then Can-am dropped a bomb by announcing the 2020 X-3 RR models with nearly 200 horsepower. After that announcement, the noise got even louder. Then on June 28th, 2019 Polaris announced the RZR XP Pro model. In this video, we’re going to compare Polaris’s new top end 64” machine, the RZR XP Pro Ultimate, with the top end 64 inch machine from Can-am, the X3 X DS Turbo RR.

Let’s get this out of the way first, these model names are getting a bit crazy…rather than referring to the Can-Am as the X-3 X DS Turbo RR and the Polaris as the RZR XP Pro Ultimate, I am just going to refer to them as the X-3 RR and the XP Pro.

This article is not meant to be an opinion on which machine is better and why.  Instead,  we will compare the X-3 RR and XP Pro in 3 different categories. Engine and drive train Specs, suspension, and interior features.

Drivetrain

 

Let’s start by comparing drivetrain. The obvious spec to lead with here is engine and horsepower.  The new XP Pro comes with a 925 cc ProStar Twin Cylinder Turbo engine delivering 181 HP while the X-3 RR has a 900CC Rotax triple cylinder turbo engine delivering a class leading 195 HP. While the Can-Am has an obvious lead when it comes to horsepower, wether or not that matters is entirely up to you.

 

When it comes to transmissions, both the X-3 RR and the XP Pro are still running a CVT transmission with both claiming to have made recent improvements to handle the increased power in later models.

As far as the Drive train goes, the XP Pro comes with what Polaris calls the “Isolated Xtreme Performance True On-Demand AWD/2WD” System. They claim to have strengthened just about everything with the drivetrain, from the transmission to hubs and everything in between.

The X-3-RR meanwhile comes with Can-am’s SmartLok true 4 mode traction system giving you 2wd, 4wd w/ front diff lock, 4wd trail active, and 4wd trail modes.

While many in the industry expected Polaris’ latest model to go right after the Horse Power numbers Can-Am is putting out, it seems like they are searching for the sweet spot between high power and drive ability. With that said, its clear that Can-Am is the market leader in for horse power and likely will be for some time.

 Suspension

Let’s start with the X-3 RR. It features double A arm suspension in the front with 20 inches of travel and Fox 2.5 Podium RC2 Piggyback shocks with compression and rebound adjustments. In the rear it has 4-link Torsion trailing arm suspension and 20 inches of travel as well. The rear also has Fox Podium 2.5 piggyback shocks with rebound adjustment and bottom out control. The ground clearance for the stock X-3 RR is 14 inches.

The XP Pro features their Dynamics 2.0 Active Suspension System.  This system includes FOX 2.5 podium Internal bypass shocks with Live Valve Electronically controlled Dampening. This system has the ability to tune the shocks on the fly based on the type of driving you are doing. As an example, in tight cornering, it will stiffen the outer shocks and soften inside ones to help you stay planted in the corners. The front suspension is a dual A-arm system with 20” on “usable Travel” while out back it features a Trailing arm suspension system with 22” of “usable Travel”. The XP pro sits at 14” of ground clearance. While both machines machines have top of the line suspension systems, the Dynamics “Live Valve” system on the Polaris offers benefits not found in any other SXS...for now...

 

Interior Features

Having watched the roll-out of the XP Pro, it was obvious that Polaris was proud of what they had done with the interior of their new model. I’m sure they spent years developing what they landed on are confident it will change the game for SXS’s. Here are a few of the features it seemed they were most proud of. First,  the seats. They moved away from the standard seat it seems like they have had in the RZR since day 1 and now have Bolstered bucket seats with 4 way adjust ability. They also added retractable 6 point click-6 harnesses.

 Second, instrumentation. In short,  it’s advanced, and they have plenty of it. The gauge cluster is made up of Dual sweeping Analog dials on the right and left sides with a 4” LCD rider information screen in the middle. The XP Pro Ultimate also comes with Polaris ride command system. A 7” touch screen display and infotainment system with GPS and a Rockford Fosgate speaker setup preinstalled.

As for the X-3 RR, there is less to talk about as far as standard features go in the interior. With that said, their Ergo-lock cockpit has a reputation for being comfortable and their stock seats do as well. As for instrumentation, the it features a 7.6” wide digital display with a new keypad allowing easier interaction with the driver information system.

The value of the interior features or “creature comforts” will vary widely from person to person. For some, having a nice stereo or GPS won’t make a difference, for others, it may be the deciding factor in them choosing which machine to go with.

 Conclusion 

Both Polaris and Can-Am continue to innovate. There is a reason they are the leaders in the UTV game. The question is, with the prices of these machines rising as fast as they are, is the value these innovations bring keeping up with the price. Only time, and the number of machines they sell will tell.

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